Posts Tagged 'Image Difference'

C# How to: Image Boundary Extraction

Article Purpose

This article explores various concepts, which feature in combination when implementing Image Boundary Extraction. Concepts covered within this article include: Morphological and , Addition and Subtraction, Boundary Sharpening, Boundary Tracing and Boundary Extraction.

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Red, Green, Blue

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Red, Greed, Blue

Sample Source Code

This article is accompanied by a sample source code Visual Studio project which is available for download .

Using the Sample Application

This article’s accompanying sample source code includes the definition of a sample application. The sample application serves as an implementation of the concepts discussed in this article. In using the sample application concepts can be easily tested and replicated.

The sample application has been defined as a . The user interface enables the user to configure several options which influence the output produced from filtering processes. The following section describes the options available to a user when executing the sample application:

  • Loading and Saving files – Users can specify source/input through clicking the Load Image button. If desired, resulting filtered can be saved to the local system when clicking the Save Image button.
  • Filter Type – The types of filters implemented represent variations on Image Boundary Extraction. The supported filter types are: Conventional Boundary extraction, Boundary Sharpening and Boundary Tracing.
  • Filter Size – Filter intensity/strength will mostly be reliant on the filter size implemented. A Filter size represents the number of neighbouring examined when applying filters.
  • Colours Applied – The sample source code and sample application provides functionality allowing a filter to only effect user specified colour components. Colour components are represented in the form of an RGB colour scheme. The inclusion or exclusion of the colour components Red, Green and Blue will be determined through user configuration.
  • Structuring Element – As mentioned, the Filter Size option determines the size of neighbourhood examined. The ’s setup determine the neighbouring   within the neighbourhood size bounds that should be used as input when calculating filter results.

The following is a screenshot of the Image Boundary Extraction sample application in action:

Image Boundary Extaction Sample  Application

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Green

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Green

Morphological Boundary Extraction

Image Boundary Extraction can be considered a method of . In contrast to more commonly implemented   methods, Image Boundary Extraction originates from Morphological Image Filters.

When drawing a comparison, Image Boundary Extraction and express strong similarities. results from the difference in and . Considered from a different point of view, creating one expressing thicker edges and another expressing thinner edges provides the means to calculate the difference in edges.

Image Boundary Extraction implements the same concept as . The base concept can be regarded as calculating the difference between two which rendered the same , but expressing a difference in . Image Boundary Extraction relies on calculating the difference between either and the source or and the source . The difference between and in most cases result in more of difference than the difference between and the source or and the source . The result of Image Boundary Extraction representing less of a difference than can be observed in Image Boundary Extraction being expressed in finer/smaller width lines.

is another method of which functions along the same basis. Edges are determined by calculating the difference between two , each having been filtered from the same source , using a of differing intensity levels.

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Red, Green, Blue

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Red, Green, Blue

Boundary Sharpening

The concept of Boundary Sharpening refers to enhancing or sharpening the boundaries or edges expressed in a source/input . Boundaries can be easily determined or extracted as discussed earlier when exploring Boundary Extraction.

The steps involved in performing Boundary Sharpening can be described as follows:

  1. Extract Boundaries – Determine boundaries by performing and calculating the difference between the dilated and the source .
  2. Match Source Edges and Extracted Boundaries – The boundaries extracted in the previous step represent the difference between and the original source . Ensure that extracted boundaries match the source through performing on a copy of the source/input .
  3. Emphasise Extracted boundaries in source image – Perform addition using the extracted boundaries and dilated copy of the source .

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Red, Green, Blue

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Red, Green, Blue

Boundary Tracing

Boundary Tracing refers to applying filters which result in /boundaries appearing darker or more pronounced. This type of filter also relies on Boundary Extraction.

Boundary Tracing can be implemented in two steps, described as follows:

  1. Extract Boundaries – Determine boundaries by performing and calculating the difference between the dilated and the source .
  2. Emphasise Extracted boundaries in source image – Subtract the extracted boundaries from the original source .

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Red, Green, Blue

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Red, Green, Blue

Implementing Morphological Erosion and Dilation

The accompanying sample source code defines the MorphologyOperation method,  defined as an targeting the class. In terms of parameters this method expects a two dimensional array representing a . The other required  parameter represents an value indicating which Morphological Operation to perform, either or .

The following code snippet provides the definition in full:

private static Bitmap MorphologyOperation(this Bitmap sourceBitmap,
                                          bool[,] se,
                                          MorphologyOperationType morphType,
                                          bool applyBlue = true,
                                          bool applyGreen = true,
                                          bool applyRed = true)
{ 
    BitmapData sourceData =
               sourceBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0,
               sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height),
               ImageLockMode.ReadOnly,
               PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);

byte[] pixelBuffer = new byte[sourceData.Stride * sourceData.Height];
byte[] resultBuffer = new byte[sourceData.Stride * sourceData.Height];
Marshal.Copy(sourceData.Scan0, pixelBuffer, 0, pixelBuffer.Length);
sourceBitmap.UnlockBits(sourceData);
int filterOffset = (se.GetLength(0) - 1) / 2; int calcOffset = 0, byteOffset = 0; byte blueErode = 0, greenErode = 0, redErode = 0; byte blueDilate = 0, greenDilate = 0, redDilate = 0;
for (int offsetY = 0; offsetY < sourceBitmap.Height - filterOffset; offsetY++) { for (int offsetX = 0; offsetX < sourceBitmap.Width - filterOffset; offsetX++) { byteOffset = offsetY * sourceData.Stride + offsetX * 4;
blueErode = 255; greenErode = 255; redErode = 255; blueDilate = 0; greenDilate = 0; redDilate = 0;
for (int filterY = -filterOffset; filterY <= filterOffset; filterY++) { for (int filterX = -filterOffset; filterX <= filterOffset; filterX++) { if (se[filterY + filterOffset, filterX + filterOffset] == true) { calcOffset = byteOffset + (filterX * 4) + (filterY * sourceData.Stride);
calcOffset = (calcOffset < 0 ? 0 : (calcOffset >= pixelBuffer.Length + 2 ? pixelBuffer.Length - 3 : calcOffset));
blueDilate = (pixelBuffer[calcOffset] > blueDilate ? pixelBuffer[calcOffset] : blueDilate);
greenDilate = (pixelBuffer[calcOffset + 1] > greenDilate ? pixelBuffer[calcOffset + 1] : greenDilate);
redDilate = (pixelBuffer[calcOffset + 2] > redDilate ? pixelBuffer[calcOffset + 2] : redDilate);
blueErode = (pixelBuffer[calcOffset] < blueErode ? pixelBuffer[calcOffset] : blueErode);
greenErode = (pixelBuffer[calcOffset + 1] < greenErode ? pixelBuffer[calcOffset + 1] : greenErode);
redErode = (pixelBuffer[calcOffset + 2] < redErode ? pixelBuffer[calcOffset + 2] : redErode); } } }
blueErode = (applyBlue ? blueErode : pixelBuffer[byteOffset]); blueDilate = (applyBlue ? blueDilate : pixelBuffer[byteOffset]);
greenErode = (applyGreen ? greenErode : pixelBuffer[byteOffset + 1]); greenDilate = (applyGreen ? greenDilate : pixelBuffer[byteOffset + 1]);
redErode = (applyRed ? redErode : pixelBuffer[byteOffset + 2]); redDilate = (applyRed ? redDilate : pixelBuffer[byteOffset + 2]);
if (morphType == MorphologyOperationType.Erosion) { resultBuffer[byteOffset] = blueErode; resultBuffer[byteOffset + 1] = greenErode; resultBuffer[byteOffset + 2] = redErode; } else if (morphType == MorphologyOperationType.Dilation) { resultBuffer[byteOffset] = blueDilate; resultBuffer[byteOffset + 1] = greenDilate; resultBuffer[byteOffset + 2] = redDilate; }
resultBuffer[byteOffset + 3] = 255; } }
Bitmap resultBitmap = new Bitmap(sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height); BitmapData resultData = resultBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, resultBitmap.Width, resultBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
Marshal.Copy(resultBuffer, 0, resultData.Scan0, resultBuffer.Length);
resultBitmap.UnlockBits(resultData);
return resultBitmap; }

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Red, Green

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Red, Green

Implementing Image Addition

The sample source code encapsulates the process of combining two separate through means of addition. The AddImage method serves as a single declaration of addition functionality. This method has been defined as an targeting the class. Boundary Sharpen filtering implements addition.

The following code snippet provides the definition of the AddImage :

private static Bitmap AddImage(this Bitmapsource Bitmap, 
                               Bitmap addBitmap)
{
    BitmapData sourceData =
               sourceBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle (0, 0,
               sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height),
               ImageLockMode.ReadOnly,
               PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);

byte[] resultBuffer = new byte[sourceData.Stride * sourceData.Height];
Marshal.Copy(sourceData.Scan0, resultBuffer, 0, resultBuffer.Length);
sourceBitmap.UnlockBits(sourceData);
BitmapData addData = addBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, addBitmap.Width, addBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
byte[] addBuffer = new byte[addData.Stride * addData.Height];
Marshal.Copy(addData.Scan0, addBuffer, 0, addBuffer.Length);
addBitmap.UnlockBits(addData);
for (int k = 0; k + 4 < resultBuffer.Length && k + 4 < addBuffer.Length; k += 4) { resultBuffer[k] = AddColors(resultBuffer[k], addBuffer[k]); resultBuffer[k + 1] = AddColors(resultBuffer[k + 1], addBuffer[k + 1]); resultBuffer[k + 2] = AddColors(resultBuffer[k + 2], addBuffer[k + 2]); resultBuffer[k + 3] = 255; }
Bitmap resultBitmap = new Bitmap(sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height);
BitmapData resultData = resultBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, resultBitmap.Width, resultBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
Marshal.Copy(resultBuffer, 0, resultData.Scan0, resultBuffer.Length);
resultBitmap.UnlockBits(resultData);
return resultBitmap; }
private static byte AddColors(byte color1, byte color2) 
{
    int result = color1 + color2; 

return (byte)(result < 0 ? 0 : (result > 255 ? 255 : result)); }

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Red, Green, Blue

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Red, Green, Blue

Implementing Image Subtraction

In a similar fashion regarding the AddImage method the sample code defines the SubractImage method.  By definition this method serves as an targeting the class. Image subtraction has been implemented in Boundary Extraction and Boundary Tracing.

The definition of the SubtractImage method listed as follows:

private static Bitmap SubtractImage(this Bitmap sourceBitmap,  
                                         Bitmap subtractBitmap) 
{
    BitmapData sourceData = 
               sourceBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, 
               sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height), 
               ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, 
               PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb); 

byte[] resultBuffer = new byte[sourceData.Stride * sourceData.Height];
Marshal.Copy(sourceData.Scan0, resultBuffer, 0, resultBuffer.Length);
sourceBitmap.UnlockBits(sourceData);
BitmapData subtractData = subtractBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, subtractBitmap.Width, subtractBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
byte[] subtractBuffer = new byte[subtractData.Stride * subtractData.Height];
Marshal.Copy(subtractData.Scan0, subtractBuffer, 0, subtractBuffer.Length);
subtractBitmap.UnlockBits(subtractData);
for (int k = 0; k + 4 < resultBuffer.Length && k + 4 < subtractBuffer.Length; k += 4) { resultBuffer[k] = SubtractColors(resultBuffer[k], subtractBuffer[k]);
resultBuffer[k + 1] = SubtractColors(resultBuffer[k + 1], subtractBuffer[k + 1]);
resultBuffer[k + 2] = SubtractColors(resultBuffer[k + 2], subtractBuffer[k + 2]);
resultBuffer[k + 3] = 255; }
Bitmap resultBitmap = new Bitmap (sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height);
BitmapData resultData = resultBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle (0, 0, resultBitmap.Width, resultBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
Marshal.Copy(resultBuffer, 0, resultData.Scan0, resultBuffer.Length);
resultBitmap.UnlockBits(resultData);
return resultBitmap; }
private static byte SubtractColors(byte color1, byte color2) 
{
    int result = (int)color1 - (int)color2; 

return (byte)(result < 0 ? 0 : result); }

 Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Green

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Green

Implementing Image Boundary Extraction

In the sample source code processing Image Boundary Extraction can be achieved when invoking the BoundaryExtraction method. Defined as an , the BoundaryExtraction method targets the class.

As discussed earlier, this method performs Boundary Extraction through subtracting the source from a dilated copy of the source .

The following code snippet details the definition of the BoundaryExtraction method:

private static Bitmap
BoundaryExtraction(this Bitmap sourceBitmap, 
                   bool[,] se, bool applyBlue = true, 
                   bool applyGreen = true, bool applyRed = true) 
{
    Bitmap resultBitmap = 
           sourceBitmap.MorphologyOperation(se,  
           MorphologyOperationType.Dilation, applyBlue,  
                                  applyGreen, applyRed); 

resultBitmap = resultBitmap.SubtractImage(sourceBitmap);
return resultBitmap; }

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Red, Blue

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Red, Blue

Implementing Image Boundary Sharpening

Boundary Sharpening in the sample source code has been implemented through the definition of the BoundarySharpen method. The BoundarySharpen targets the class. The following code snippet provides the definition:

private static Bitmap 
BoundarySharpen(this Bitmap sourceBitmap, 
                bool[,] se, bool applyBlue = true, 
                bool applyGreen = true, bool applyRed = true) 
{
    Bitmap resultBitmap = 
           sourceBitmap.BoundaryExtraction(se, applyBlue, 
                                           applyGreen, applyRed); 

resultBitmap = sourceBitmap.MorphologyOperation(se, MorphologyOperationType.Dilation, applyBlue, applyGreen, applyRed).AddImage(resultBitmap);
return resultBitmap; }

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Green

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Green

Implementing Image Boundary Tracing

Boundary Tracing has been defined through the BoundaryTrace , which targets the class. Similar to the BoundarySharpen method this method performs Boundary Extraction, the result of which serves to be subtracted from the original source . Subtracting boundaries/edges result in those boundaries/edges being darkened, or traced. The definition of the BoundaryTracing detailed as follows:

private static Bitmap
BoundaryTrace(this Bitmap sourceBitmap, 
              bool[,] se, bool applyBlue = true, 
              bool applyGreen = true, bool applyRed = true) 
{
    Bitmap resultBitmap =
    sourceBitmap.BoundaryExtraction(se, applyBlue,  
                                    applyGreen, applyRed); 

resultBitmap = sourceBitmap.SubtractImage(resultBitmap);
return resultBitmap; }

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Green, Blue

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Green, Blue

Implementing a Wrapper Method

The BoundaryExtractionFilter method is the only method defined as publicly accessible. Following convention, this method’s definition signals the method as an targeting the class. This method has the intention of acting as a wrapper method, a single method capable of performing Boundary Extraction, Boundary Sharpening and Boundary Tracing, depending on method parameters.

The definition of the BoundaryExtractionFilter method detailed by the following code snippet:

public static Bitmap
BoundaryExtractionFilter(this Bitmap sourceBitmap, 
                         bool[,] se, BoundaryExtractionFilterType  
                         filterType, bool applyBlue = true, 
                         bool applyGreen = true, bool applyRed = true) 
{
    Bitmap resultBitmap = null; 

if (filterType == BoundaryExtractionFilterType.BoundaryExtraction) { resultBitmap = sourceBitmap.BoundaryExtraction(se, applyBlue, applyGreen, applyRed); } else if (filterType == BoundaryExtractionFilterType.BoundarySharpen) { resultBitmap = sourceBitmap.BoundarySharpen(se, applyBlue, applyGreen, applyRed); } else if (filterType == BoundaryExtractionFilterType.BoundaryTrace) { resultBitmap = sourceBitmap.BoundaryTrace(se, applyBlue, applyGreen, applyRed); }
return resultBitmap; }

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3×3, Red, Green, Blue

Parrot: Boundary Extraction, 3x3, Red, Green, Blue

Sample Images

This article features a number of sample images. All featured images have been licensed allowing for reproduction. The following images feature as sample images:

1280px-Ara_macao_-Diergaarde_Blijdorp_-flying-8a

Ara_macao_-flying_away-8a

Ara_ararauna_Luc_Viatour

1280px-Macaws_at_Seaport_Village_-USA-8a

Ara_macao_-on_a_small_bicycle-8

Psarisomus_dalhousiae_-_Kaeng_Krachan

Related Articles and Feedback

Feedback and questions are always encouraged. If you know of an alternative implementation or have ideas on a more efficient implementation please share in the comments section.

I’ve published a number of articles related to imaging and images of which you can find URL links here:

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C# How to: Image Arithmetic

Article Purpose

The objective of this article is to illustrate Arithmetic being implemented when blending/combining two separate into a single result . The types of Image Arithmetic discussed are: Average, Add, SubtractLeft, SubtractRight, Difference, Multiply, Min, Max and Amplitude.

I created the following by implementing Image Arithmetic using as input a photo of a friend’s ear and a photograph taken at a live concert performance by The Red Hot Chili Peppers.

The-RHCP-Sound_Scaled

Sample source code

This article is accompanied by a sample source code Visual Studio project which is available for download here.

Download15

Using the Sample Application

The Sample source code accompanying this article includes a Sample Application developed on a platform. The Sample Application is indented to provide an implementation of the various types of Image Arithmetic explored in this article.

The Image Arithmetic sample application allows the user to select two source/input from the local file system. The user interface defines a ComboBox dropdown populated with entries relating to types of Image Arithmetic.

The following is a screenshot taken whilst creating the “Red Hot Chili Peppers Concert – Side profile Ear” blended illustrated in the first shown in this article. Notice the stark contrast when comparing the source/input preview . Implementing Image Arithmetic allows us to create a smoothly blended result :

ImageArithmetic_SampleApplication

Newly created can be saved to the local file system by clicking the ‘Save Image’ button.

Image Arithmetic

In simple terms Image Arithmetic involves the process of performing calculations on two ’ corresponding pixel colour components. The values resulting from performing calculations represent a single which is combination of the two original source/input . The extent to which a source/input will be represented in the resulting is dependent on the type of Image Arithmetic employed.

The ArithmeticBlend Extension method

In this article Image Arithmetic has been implemented as a single targeting the class. The ArithmeticBlend expects as parameters two source/input objects and a value indicating the type of Image Arithmetic to perform.

The ColorCalculationType defines an value for each type of Image Arithmetic supported. The definition as follows:

public enum ColorCalculationType 
{ 
   Average, 
   Add, 
   SubtractLeft, 
   SubtractRight, 
   Difference, 
   Multiply, 
   Min, 
   Max, 
   Amplitude 
}

It is only within the ArithmeticBlend that we perform Image Arithmetic. This method accesses the underlying pixel data of each sample and creates copies stored in arrays. Each element within the array data buffer represents a single colour component, either Alpha, Red, Green or Blue.

The following code snippet details the implementation of the ArithmeticBlend :

 public static Bitmap ArithmeticBlend(this Bitmap sourceBitmap, Bitmap blendBitmap,  
                                 ColorCalculator.ColorCalculationType calculationType) 
{ 
    BitmapData sourceData = sourceBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle (0, 0, 
                            sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height), 
                            ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb); 

byte[] pixelBuffer = new byte[sourceData.Stride * sourceData.Height]; Marshal.Copy(sourceData.Scan0, pixelBuffer, 0, pixelBuffer.Length); sourceBitmap.UnlockBits(sourceData);
BitmapData blendData = blendBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle (0, 0, blendBitmap.Width, blendBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
byte[] blendBuffer = new byte [blendData.Stride * blendData.Height]; Marshal.Copy(blendData.Scan0, blendBuffer, 0, blendBuffer.Length); blendBitmap.UnlockBits(blendData);
for (int k = 0; (k + 4 < pixelBuffer.Length) && (k + 4 < blendBuffer.Length); k += 4) { pixelBuffer[k] = ColorCalculator.Calculate(pixelBuffer[k], blendBuffer[k], calculationType);
pixelBuffer[k + 1] = ColorCalculator.Calculate(pixelBuffer[k + 1], blendBuffer[k + 1], calculationType);
pixelBuffer[k + 2] = ColorCalculator.Calculate(pixelBuffer[k + 2], blendBuffer[k + 2], calculationType); }
Bitmap resultBitmap = new Bitmap(sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height);
BitmapData resultData = resultBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle (0, 0, resultBitmap.Width, resultBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
Marshal.Copy(pixelBuffer, 0, resultData.Scan0, pixelBuffer.Length); resultBitmap.UnlockBits(resultData);
return resultBitmap; }

We access and copy the underlying pixel data of each input by making use of the method and also the method.

The method iterates both array data buffers simultaneously, having set the for loop condition to regard the array size of both arrays. Scenarios where array data buffers will differ in size occurs when the source specified are not equal in terms of size dimensions.

Notice how each iteration increments the loop counter by a factor of four allowing us to treat each iteration as a complete pixel value. Remember that each data buffer element represents an individual colour component. Every four elements represents a single pixel consisting of the components: Alpha, Red, Green and Blue

Take Note: The ordering of colour components are the exact opposite of the expected order. Each pixel’s colour components are ordered: Blue, Green, Red, Alpha. Since we are iterating an entire pixel with each iteration the for loop counter value will always equate to an element index representing the Blue colour component. In order to access the Red and Green colour components we simply add the values one and two respectively to the for loop counter value, depending on whether accessing the Green or Red colour components.

The task of performing the actual arithmetic has been encapsulated within the static Calculate method, a public member of the static class ColorCalculator. The Calculate method is more detail in the following section of this article.

The final task performed by the ArithmeticBlend method involves creating a new instance of the class which is then updated/populated using the resulting array data buffer previously modified.

The ColorCalculator.Calculate method

The algorithms implemented in Image Arithmetic are encapsulated within the ColorCalculator.Calculate method. When implementing this method no knowledge of the technical implementation details are required. The parameters required are two values each representing a single colour component, one from each source . The only other required parameter is an value of type ColorCalculationType which will indicate which type of Image Arithmetic should be implemented using the parameters as operands.

The following code snippet details the full implementation of the ColorCalculator.Calculate method:

 public static byte Calculate(byte color1, byte color2, 
                   ColorCalculationType calculationType) 
{ 
    byte resultValue = 0; 
    int intResult = 0; 

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Add) { intResult = color1 + color2; } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Average) { intResult = (color1 + color2) / 2; } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.SubtractLeft) { intResult = color1 - color2; } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.SubtractRight) { intResult = color2 - color1; } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Difference) { intResult = Math.Abs(color1 - color2); } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Multiply) { intResult = (int)((color1 / 255.0 * color2 / 255.0) * 255.0); } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Min) { intResult = (color1 < color2 ? color1 : color2); } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Max) { intResult = (color1 > color2 ? color1 : color2); } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Amplitude) { intResult = (int)(Math.Sqrt(color1 * color1 + color2 * color2) / Math .Sqrt(2.0)); }
if (intResult < 0) { resultValue = 0; } else if (intResult > 255) { resultValue = 255; } else { resultValue = (byte)intResult; }
return resultValue; }

The bulk of the ColorCalculator.Calculate method’s implementation is set around a series of if/else if statements evaluating the method parameter passed when the method had been invoked.

Colour component values can only range from 0 to 255 inclusive. Calculations performed might result in values which do not fall within the valid range of values. Calculated values less than zero are set to zero and values exceeding 255 are set to 255, sometimes this is referred to clamping.

The following sections of this article provides an explanation of each type of Image Arithmetic implemented.

Image Arithmetic: Add

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Add)
{
    intResult = color1 + color2;
}

The Add algorithm is straightforward, simply adding together the two colour component values. In other words the resulting colour component will be set to equal the sum of both source colour component, provided the total does not exceed 255.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Add

Image Arithmetic: Average

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Average)
{
    intResult = (color1 + color2) / 2;
}

The Average algorithm calculates a simple average by adding together the two colour components and then dividing the result by two.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Average

Image Arithmetic: SubtractLeft

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.SubtractLeft)
{
    intResult = color1 - color2;
}

The SubtractLeft algorithm subtracts the value of the second colour component parameter from the first colour component parameter.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_SubtractLeft

Image Arithmetic: SubtractRight

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.SubtractRight)
{
    intResult = color2 - color1;
}

The SubtractRight algorithm, in contrast to SubtractLeft, subtracts the value of the first colour component parameter from the second colour component parameter.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_SubtractRight

Image Arithmetic: Difference

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Difference)
{
    intResult = Math.Abs(color1 - color2);
}

The Difference algorithm subtracts the value of the second colour component parameter from the first colour component parameter. By passing the result of the subtraction as a parameter to the Math.Abs method the algorithm ensures only calculating absolute/positive values. In other words calculating the difference in value between colour component parameters.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Difference

Image Arithmetic: Multiply

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Multiply)
{
    intResult = (int)((color1 / 255.0 * color2 / 255.0) * 255.0);
}

The Multiply algorithm divides each colour component parameter by a value of 255 and the proceeds to multiply the results of the division, the result is then further multiplied by a value of 255.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Multiply

Image Arithmetic: Min

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Min)
{
    intResult = (color1 < color2 ? color1 : color2);
}

The Min algorithm simply compares the two colour component parameters and returns the smallest value of the two.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Min

Image Arithmetic: Max

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Max)
{
    intResult = (color1 > color2 ? color1 : color2);
}

The Max algorithm, as can be expected, will produce the exact opposite result when compared to the Min algorithm. This algorithm compares the two colour component parameters and returns the larger value of the two.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Max

Image Arithmetic: Amplitude

 else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Amplitude) 
{ 
         intResult = (int)(Math.Sqrt(color1 * color1 +
                                     color2 * color2) /
                                     Math.Sqrt(2.0)); 
} 
  

The Amplitude algorithm calculates the amplitude of the two colour component parameters by multiplying each colour component by itself and then sums the results. The last step divides the result thus far by the square root of two.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Amplitude

Related Articles

Dewald Esterhuizen

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