Posts Tagged 'Image Add'

C# How to: Image Arithmetic

Article Purpose

The objective of this article is to illustrate Arithmetic being implemented when blending/combining two separate into a single result . The types of Image Arithmetic discussed are: Average, Add, SubtractLeft, SubtractRight, Difference, Multiply, Min, Max and Amplitude.

I created the following by implementing Image Arithmetic using as input a photo of a friend’s ear and a photograph taken at a live concert performance by The Red Hot Chili Peppers.

The-RHCP-Sound_Scaled

Sample source code

This article is accompanied by a sample source code Visual Studio project which is available for download here.

Download15

Using the Sample Application

The Sample source code accompanying this article includes a Sample Application developed on a platform. The Sample Application is indented to provide an implementation of the various types of Image Arithmetic explored in this article.

The Image Arithmetic sample application allows the user to select two source/input from the local file system. The user interface defines a ComboBox dropdown populated with entries relating to types of Image Arithmetic.

The following is a screenshot taken whilst creating the “Red Hot Chili Peppers Concert – Side profile Ear” blended illustrated in the first shown in this article. Notice the stark contrast when comparing the source/input preview . Implementing Image Arithmetic allows us to create a smoothly blended result :

ImageArithmetic_SampleApplication

Newly created can be saved to the local file system by clicking the ‘Save Image’ button.

Image Arithmetic

In simple terms Image Arithmetic involves the process of performing calculations on two ’ corresponding pixel colour components. The values resulting from performing calculations represent a single which is combination of the two original source/input . The extent to which a source/input will be represented in the resulting is dependent on the type of Image Arithmetic employed.

The ArithmeticBlend Extension method

In this article Image Arithmetic has been implemented as a single targeting the class. The ArithmeticBlend expects as parameters two source/input objects and a value indicating the type of Image Arithmetic to perform.

The ColorCalculationType defines an value for each type of Image Arithmetic supported. The definition as follows:

public enum ColorCalculationType 
{ 
   Average, 
   Add, 
   SubtractLeft, 
   SubtractRight, 
   Difference, 
   Multiply, 
   Min, 
   Max, 
   Amplitude 
}

It is only within the ArithmeticBlend that we perform Image Arithmetic. This method accesses the underlying pixel data of each sample and creates copies stored in arrays. Each element within the array data buffer represents a single colour component, either Alpha, Red, Green or Blue.

The following code snippet details the implementation of the ArithmeticBlend :

 public static Bitmap ArithmeticBlend(this Bitmap sourceBitmap, Bitmap blendBitmap,  
                                 ColorCalculator.ColorCalculationType calculationType) 
{ 
    BitmapData sourceData = sourceBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle (0, 0, 
                            sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height), 
                            ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb); 

byte[] pixelBuffer = new byte[sourceData.Stride * sourceData.Height]; Marshal.Copy(sourceData.Scan0, pixelBuffer, 0, pixelBuffer.Length); sourceBitmap.UnlockBits(sourceData);
BitmapData blendData = blendBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle (0, 0, blendBitmap.Width, blendBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
byte[] blendBuffer = new byte [blendData.Stride * blendData.Height]; Marshal.Copy(blendData.Scan0, blendBuffer, 0, blendBuffer.Length); blendBitmap.UnlockBits(blendData);
for (int k = 0; (k + 4 < pixelBuffer.Length) && (k + 4 < blendBuffer.Length); k += 4) { pixelBuffer[k] = ColorCalculator.Calculate(pixelBuffer[k], blendBuffer[k], calculationType);
pixelBuffer[k + 1] = ColorCalculator.Calculate(pixelBuffer[k + 1], blendBuffer[k + 1], calculationType);
pixelBuffer[k + 2] = ColorCalculator.Calculate(pixelBuffer[k + 2], blendBuffer[k + 2], calculationType); }
Bitmap resultBitmap = new Bitmap(sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height);
BitmapData resultData = resultBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle (0, 0, resultBitmap.Width, resultBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
Marshal.Copy(pixelBuffer, 0, resultData.Scan0, pixelBuffer.Length); resultBitmap.UnlockBits(resultData);
return resultBitmap; }

We access and copy the underlying pixel data of each input by making use of the method and also the method.

The method iterates both array data buffers simultaneously, having set the for loop condition to regard the array size of both arrays. Scenarios where array data buffers will differ in size occurs when the source specified are not equal in terms of size dimensions.

Notice how each iteration increments the loop counter by a factor of four allowing us to treat each iteration as a complete pixel value. Remember that each data buffer element represents an individual colour component. Every four elements represents a single pixel consisting of the components: Alpha, Red, Green and Blue

Take Note: The ordering of colour components are the exact opposite of the expected order. Each pixel’s colour components are ordered: Blue, Green, Red, Alpha. Since we are iterating an entire pixel with each iteration the for loop counter value will always equate to an element index representing the Blue colour component. In order to access the Red and Green colour components we simply add the values one and two respectively to the for loop counter value, depending on whether accessing the Green or Red colour components.

The task of performing the actual arithmetic has been encapsulated within the static Calculate method, a public member of the static class ColorCalculator. The Calculate method is more detail in the following section of this article.

The final task performed by the ArithmeticBlend method involves creating a new instance of the class which is then updated/populated using the resulting array data buffer previously modified.

The ColorCalculator.Calculate method

The algorithms implemented in Image Arithmetic are encapsulated within the ColorCalculator.Calculate method. When implementing this method no knowledge of the technical implementation details are required. The parameters required are two values each representing a single colour component, one from each source . The only other required parameter is an value of type ColorCalculationType which will indicate which type of Image Arithmetic should be implemented using the parameters as operands.

The following code snippet details the full implementation of the ColorCalculator.Calculate method:

 public static byte Calculate(byte color1, byte color2, 
                   ColorCalculationType calculationType) 
{ 
    byte resultValue = 0; 
    int intResult = 0; 

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Add) { intResult = color1 + color2; } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Average) { intResult = (color1 + color2) / 2; } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.SubtractLeft) { intResult = color1 - color2; } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.SubtractRight) { intResult = color2 - color1; } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Difference) { intResult = Math.Abs(color1 - color2); } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Multiply) { intResult = (int)((color1 / 255.0 * color2 / 255.0) * 255.0); } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Min) { intResult = (color1 < color2 ? color1 : color2); } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Max) { intResult = (color1 > color2 ? color1 : color2); } else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Amplitude) { intResult = (int)(Math.Sqrt(color1 * color1 + color2 * color2) / Math .Sqrt(2.0)); }
if (intResult < 0) { resultValue = 0; } else if (intResult > 255) { resultValue = 255; } else { resultValue = (byte)intResult; }
return resultValue; }

The bulk of the ColorCalculator.Calculate method’s implementation is set around a series of if/else if statements evaluating the method parameter passed when the method had been invoked.

Colour component values can only range from 0 to 255 inclusive. Calculations performed might result in values which do not fall within the valid range of values. Calculated values less than zero are set to zero and values exceeding 255 are set to 255, sometimes this is referred to clamping.

The following sections of this article provides an explanation of each type of Image Arithmetic implemented.

Image Arithmetic: Add

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Add)
{
    intResult = color1 + color2;
}

The Add algorithm is straightforward, simply adding together the two colour component values. In other words the resulting colour component will be set to equal the sum of both source colour component, provided the total does not exceed 255.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Add

Image Arithmetic: Average

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Average)
{
    intResult = (color1 + color2) / 2;
}

The Average algorithm calculates a simple average by adding together the two colour components and then dividing the result by two.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Average

Image Arithmetic: SubtractLeft

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.SubtractLeft)
{
    intResult = color1 - color2;
}

The SubtractLeft algorithm subtracts the value of the second colour component parameter from the first colour component parameter.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_SubtractLeft

Image Arithmetic: SubtractRight

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.SubtractRight)
{
    intResult = color2 - color1;
}

The SubtractRight algorithm, in contrast to SubtractLeft, subtracts the value of the first colour component parameter from the second colour component parameter.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_SubtractRight

Image Arithmetic: Difference

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Difference)
{
    intResult = Math.Abs(color1 - color2);
}

The Difference algorithm subtracts the value of the second colour component parameter from the first colour component parameter. By passing the result of the subtraction as a parameter to the Math.Abs method the algorithm ensures only calculating absolute/positive values. In other words calculating the difference in value between colour component parameters.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Difference

Image Arithmetic: Multiply

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Multiply)
{
    intResult = (int)((color1 / 255.0 * color2 / 255.0) * 255.0);
}

The Multiply algorithm divides each colour component parameter by a value of 255 and the proceeds to multiply the results of the division, the result is then further multiplied by a value of 255.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Multiply

Image Arithmetic: Min

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Min)
{
    intResult = (color1 < color2 ? color1 : color2);
}

The Min algorithm simply compares the two colour component parameters and returns the smallest value of the two.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Min

Image Arithmetic: Max

if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Max)
{
    intResult = (color1 > color2 ? color1 : color2);
}

The Max algorithm, as can be expected, will produce the exact opposite result when compared to the Min algorithm. This algorithm compares the two colour component parameters and returns the larger value of the two.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Max

Image Arithmetic: Amplitude

 else if (calculationType == ColorCalculationType.Amplitude) 
{ 
         intResult = (int)(Math.Sqrt(color1 * color1 +
                                     color2 * color2) /
                                     Math.Sqrt(2.0)); 
} 
  

The Amplitude algorithm calculates the amplitude of the two colour component parameters by multiplying each colour component by itself and then sums the results. The last step divides the result thus far by the square root of two.

Sample Image

ImageArithmetic_Amplitude

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C# How to: Bitmap Colour Substitution implementing thresholds

Article Purpose

This article is aimed at detailing how to implement the process of substituting the colour values that form part of a image. Colour substitution is implemented by means of a threshold value. By implementing a threshold a range of similar colours can be substituted.

Sample source code

This article is accompanied by a sample source code Visual Studio project which is available for download here.

Using the sample Application

The provided sample source code builds a Windows Forms application which can be used to test/implement the concepts described in this article. The sample application enables the user to load an file from the file system, the user can then specify the colour to replace, the replacement colour and the threshold to apply. The following image is a screenshot of the sample application in action.

BitmapColourSubstitution_Scaled

The scenario detailed in the above screenshot shows the sample application being used to create an where the sky has more of a bluish hue when compared to the original .

Notice how replacement colour does not simply appear as a solid colour applied throughout. The replacement colour gets implemented matching the intensity of the colour being substituted.

The colour filter options:

FilterOptions

The colour to replace was taken from the original , the replacement colour is specified through a colour picker dialog. When a user clicks on either displayed, the colour of the pixel clicked on sets the value of the replacement colour. By adjusting the threshold value the user can specify how wide or narrow the range of colours to replace should be. The higher the threshold value, the wider the range of colours that will be replaced.

The resulting image can be saved by clicking the “Save Result” button. In order to apply another colour substitution on the resulting image click the button labelled “Set Result as Source”.

Colour Substitution Filter Data

The sample source code provides the definition for the ColorSubstitutionFilter class. The purpose of this class is to contain data required when applying colour substitution. The ColorSubstitutionFilter class is defined as follows:

public class ColorSubstitutionFilter
{
    private int thresholdValue = 10;
    public int ThresholdValue
    {
        get { return thresholdValue; }
        set { thresholdValue = value; }
    }

private Color sourceColor = Color.White; public Color SourceColor { get { return sourceColor; } set { sourceColor = value; } }
private Color newColor = Color.White; public Color NewColor { get { return newColor; } set { newColor = value; } } }

To implement a colour substitution filter we first have to create an object instance of type ColorSubstitutionFilter. A colour substitution requires specifying a SourceColor, which is the colour to replace/substitute and a NewColour, which defines the colour that will replace the SourceColour. Also required is a ThresholdValue, which determines a range of colours based on the SourceColor.

Colour Substitution implemented as an Extension method

The sample source code defines the ColorSubstitution extension method which targets the class. Invoking the ColorSubstitution requires passing a parameter of type ColorSubstitutionFilter, which defines how colour substitution is to be implemented. The following code snippet contains the definition of the ColorSubstitution method.

public static Bitmap ColorSubstitution(this Bitmap sourceBitmap, ColorSubstitutionFilter filterData)
{
    Bitmap resultBitmap = new Bitmap(sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);

BitmapData sourceData = sourceBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb); BitmapData resultData = resultBitmap.LockBits(new Rectangle(0, 0, resultBitmap.Width, resultBitmap.Height), ImageLockMode.WriteOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
byte[] resultBuffer = new byte[resultData.Stride * resultData.Height]; Marshal.Copy(sourceData.Scan0, resultBuffer, 0, resultBuffer.Length);
sourceBitmap.UnlockBits(sourceData);
byte sourceRed = 0, sourceGreen = 0, sourceBlue = 0, sourceAlpha = 0; int resultRed = 0, resultGreen = 0, resultBlue = 0;
byte newRedValue = filterData.NewColor.R; byte newGreenValue = filterData.NewColor.G; byte newBlueValue = filterData.NewColor.B;
byte redFilter = filterData.SourceColor.R; byte greenFilter = filterData.SourceColor.G; byte blueFilter = filterData.SourceColor.B;
byte minValue = 0; byte maxValue = 255;
for (int k = 0; k < resultBuffer.Length; k += 4) { sourceAlpha = resultBuffer[k + 3];
if (sourceAlpha != 0) { sourceBlue = resultBuffer[k]; sourceGreen = resultBuffer[k + 1]; sourceRed = resultBuffer[k + 2];
if ((sourceBlue < blueFilter + filterData.ThresholdValue && sourceBlue > blueFilter - filterData.ThresholdValue) &&
(sourceGreen < greenFilter + filterData.ThresholdValue && sourceGreen > greenFilter - filterData.ThresholdValue) &&
(sourceRed < redFilter + filterData.ThresholdValue && sourceRed > redFilter - filterData.ThresholdValue)) { resultBlue = blueFilter - sourceBlue + newBlueValue;
if (resultBlue > maxValue) { resultBlue = maxValue;} else if (resultBlue < minValue) { resultBlue = minValue;}
resultGreen = greenFilter - sourceGreen + newGreenValue;
if (resultGreen > maxValue) { resultGreen = maxValue;} else if (resultGreen < minValue) { resultGreen = minValue;}
resultRed = redFilter - sourceRed + newRedValue;
if (resultRed > maxValue) { resultRed = maxValue;} else if (resultRed < minValue) { resultRed = minValue;}
resultBuffer[k] = (byte)resultBlue; resultBuffer[k + 1] = (byte)resultGreen; resultBuffer[k + 2] = (byte)resultRed; resultBuffer[k + 3] = sourceAlpha; } } }
Marshal.Copy(resultBuffer, 0, resultData.Scan0, resultBuffer.Length); resultBitmap.UnlockBits(resultData);
return resultBitmap; }

The ColorSubstitution method can be labelled as due to its implementation. Being implies that the source/input data will not be modified, instead a new instance will be created reflecting the source data as modified by the operations performed in the particular method.

The first statement defined in the ColorSubstitution method body instantiates an instance of a new , matching the size dimensions of the source object. Next the method invokes the method on the source and result instances. When invoking the underlying data representing a will be locked in memory. Being locked in memory can also be described as signalling/preventing the Garbage Collector to not move around in memory the data being locked. Invoking results in the Garbage Collector functioning as per normal, moving data in memory and updating the relevant memory references when required.

The source code continues by copying all the representing the source to an array of bytes that represents the resulting . At this stage the source and result s are exactly identical and as yet unmodified. In order to determine which pixels based on colour should be modified the source code iterates through the byte array associated with the result .

Notice how the for loop increments by 4 with each loop. The underlying data represents a 32 Bits per pixel Argb , which equates to 8 bits/1 representing an individual colour component, either Alpha, Red, Green or Blue. Defining the for loop to increment by 4 results in each loop iterating 4 or 32 bits, in essence 1 pixel.

Within the for loop we determine if the colour expressed by the current pixel adjusted by the threshold value forms part of the colour range that should be updated. It is important to remember that an individual colour component is a byte value and can only be set to a value between 0 and 255 inclusive.

The Implementation

The ColorSubstitution method is implemented by the sample source code  through a Windows Forms application. The ColorSubstitution method requires that the source specified must be  formatted as a 32 Bpp Argb . When the user loads a source image from the file system the sample application attempts to convert the selected file by invoking the Format32bppArgbCopy which targets the class. The definition is as follows:

public static Bitmap Format32bppArgbCopy(this Bitmap sourceBitmap)
{
    Bitmap copyBitmap = new Bitmap(sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);

using (Graphics graphicsObject = Graphics.FromImage(copyBitmap)) { graphicsObject.CompositingQuality = System.Drawing.Drawing2D.CompositingQuality.HighQuality; graphicsObject.InterpolationMode = System.Drawing.Drawing2D.InterpolationMode.HighQualityBicubic; graphicsObject.PixelOffsetMode = System.Drawing.Drawing2D.PixelOffsetMode.HighQuality; graphicsObject.SmoothingMode = System.Drawing.Drawing2D.SmoothingMode.HighQuality;
graphicsObject.DrawImage(sourceBitmap, new Rectangle(0, 0, sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height), new Rectangle(0, 0, sourceBitmap.Width, sourceBitmap.Height), GraphicsUnit.Pixel); }
return copyBitmap; }

Colour Substitution Examples

The following section illustrates a few examples of colour substitution result . The source image features Bellis perennis also known as the common European Daisy (see Wikipedia). The image file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license. The original image can be downloaded here. The following image is a scaled down version of the original:

Bellis_perennis_white_(aka)_scaled

Light Blue Colour Substitution

Colour Component Source Colour Substitute Colour
Red   255   121
Green   223   188
Blue   224   255

Daisy_light_blue

Medium Blue Colour Substitution

Colour Component Source Colour Substitute Colour
Red   255   34
Green   223   34
Blue   224   255

Daisy_medium_blue

Medium Green Colour Substitution

Colour Component Source Colour Substitute Colour
Red   255   0
Green   223   128
Blue   224   0

Daisy_medium_green

Purple Colour Substitution

Colour Component Source Colour Substitute Colour
Red   255   128
Green   223   0
Blue   224   255

Daisy_purple

Related Articles and Feedback

Feedback and questions are always encouraged. If you know of an alternative implementation or have ideas on a more efficient implementation please share in the comments section.

I’ve published a number of articles related to imaging and images of which you can find URL links here:


Dewald Esterhuizen

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